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Why Polish Food & Pierogi are Capturing American Palates

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Polish food is a hot trend.  Everyday we hear from customers who tell us about their incredible travels to Poland where they discovered, or rediscovered, Polish cuisine. Today, the movement of going on a Polish culinary vacation is not just for the experienced chef, but anyone looking to enjoy a customized, intimate cooking tour throughout various regions of Poland. The food MUST be good if people are paying top dollar to experience hands-on and demonstration-style cooking lessons in Polish villages and acclaimed urban restaurants across the countryside, just for fun.  You can learn to make Steak Tartare, Herring, Zurek, Golabki, Pierogi, Racuszki, and much more.  Polish cuisine is not just emerging due to travel.  New Eastern European restaurants with exquisite dishes are popping up in major U.S. cities and Polish culinary delights such as delicate gourmet pierogi are hitting more menus across the country. 

Due to American's growing interest in Polish cuisine, Gourmet News, a business newspaper for the gourmet industry, interviewed Tomasz Piszczek, the founder of Polska Foods, and wrote an interesting article about how and why Polish food is transforming in America and abroad, and why people want to buy pierogi with a new twist.  Check it out below:

Up-and-Coming Global Cuisines Looking to Capture American Palates

By: Lucas Witman

'Until the 1930s, few Americans had ever tasted a taco or burrito, but since then, Mexican cuisine has become a ubiquitous staple in this country. Likewise, before the 1980s, most American diners would have found it appalling to sit down to a plate of raw fish and rice, but today it seems that there is a sushi bar on every urban street corner. And living in a country with 43,000 Chinese restaurants, it can be easy to forget that there was once a time when the cuisine of China was about as foreign to American eaters as the cuisine of Mars.

Throughout American history, palates (and, subsequently, the foods American cooks place on their dinner tables) have constantly evolved. There are a variety of reasons for this, including the effects of immigration, American travel abroad, the careful marketing of global cuisines in this country and the simple transformation of tastes. It is understood that the dishes most popular with one generation are almost certain to be different from those most beloved by the next. With American palates shifting so rapidly, and with the potential rewards for staying on top of the trends so great, many are motivated to shape and predict what will be the next big thing in global cuisine. 

Polish cuisine attracting adventurous gourmands

According to the American Community Survey, there are currently almost 10 million Polish Americans living in the United States, making up 3.3 percent of the total population. In Wisconsin and Michigan, over 9 percent of the population is of Polish descent. As the Polish population in this country is burgeoning, so is the importation of goods from Poland. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, between 2010 and 2013, the value of goods imported into this country from Poland increased 65.5 percent.

Restaurant in Poland

International travel to Poland is also up (over 12 percent since 2009), and Americans make up the second largest group of visitors to the country after the French. The cuisine of Poland has become one of the draws bringing American tourists to the country. In part due to the success of high end gourmet Polish eateries, such as Warsaw’s Atelier Amaro, the first restaurant in Poland to receive the Michelin rising star award, hungry food tourists are flocking to Eastern Europe to taste indigenous Polish ingredients prepared with 21 century techniques.

According to Tomasz Piszczek, founder of Polish specialty food company Polska Foods, Inc., the increasing popularity of Poland as a destination for food tourists and of Polish food more generally in this country is the result of Polish chefs going back to the country’s pre-communist roots and re-inventing the national cuisine with an eye toward freshness and flavor. “During the communists, the Polish kitchen used a lot of salt, fat and black pepper to increase the flavor. You didn’t have too many spices. It was difficult to get access to traditional ingredients such as cloves, anise, figs, cinnamon, saffron, walnuts, almonds, and nutmeg,” said Piszczek.

Piszczek explained that contemporary chefs specializing in Polish cuisine approach the country’s food traditions in a different way. “The new generation in Poland right now is bringing back their culinary heritage of the past centuries—food with exquisite flavor that was influenced by Italian Queen Bona in the 16th century in Poland, who brought culinary lavishness to the Polish court,” he said. “As the new generation returns to old traditions, and as more people travel to Poland, many are rediscovering Polish cuisine that artfully blends many European flavors into one celebrated dish, setting the record straight for future generations.” According to Piszczek, this modern Polish cuisine features a wide variety of spices, vegetables, seeds and nuts, and this is the Polish cuisine he sees growing in popularity among U.S. eaters.'

To read the full article about other emerging cuisines, visit their site at http://www.gourmetnews.com/coming-global-cuisines-looking-capture-american-palates/

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